UPDATED 05.28PM IST

Share This
  • UK |
  • India |
  • USA |
  • Canada |
  • Mauritius
  •    info@mayatoday.com
Deepak Dogra
  • ad
  • ad
  • ad
  • ad
  • ad
  • ad
  • ad
  • ad
  • ad
  • ad

Top Stories

  • Excess body fat increases dementia risk: Study

    01.12.2017 | Obese people are at an increased risk of developing dementia than those with a normal weight, says a large study involving data from 1.3 million adults. The researchers found that each five-unit increase in body mass index (BMI) was associated with a 16-33 per cent higher risk of this condition.Five BMI units is 14.5kg for a person who is five feet and seven inch (170cm) tall. This study, published in the Alzheimer’s & Dementia journal, suggests that maintaining a healthy weight could prevent, or at least delay, dementia.The researchers also found that people near dementia onset, who then go on to develop dementia, tend to have lower body weight than their dementia-free counterparts.“The BMI-dementia association observed in longitudinal population studies, such as ours, is actually attributable to two processes,” said lead author of the study, Professor Mika Kivimaki of University College London. One is an adverse effect of excess body fat on dementia risk and the other is weight loss due to pre-clinical dementia.“For this reason, people who develop dementia may have a higher-than-average body mass index some 20 years before dementia onset, but close to overt dementia have a lower BMI than those who remain healthy,” Kivimaki said.The study confirms both the adverse effect of obesity as well as weight loss caused by metabolic changes during the pre-dementia stage. In this study, researchers from across Europe pooled individual-level data from 39 longitudinal population studies from the US and Europe.A total of 1,349,857 dementia-free adults participated in these studies and their weight and height were assessed. Dementia was ascertained using linkage to electronic health records obtained from hospitalisation, prescribed medication and death registries.A total of 6,894 participants developed dementia during up to 38 years of follow-up. Two decades before symptomatic dementia, higher BMI predicted dementia occurrence, the study said. The researchers also found that mean level of BMI during pre-clinical stage close to dementia onset was lower compared to that in participants who remained healthy.

  • US tobacco firms to publish anti-smoking ads in dailies

    23.11.2017 | Major American cigarette manufacturers will begin publishing anti-smoking ads in 50 dailies to correct the misleading statements they made over the years about the effects of smoking, a move that complies with a court order filed in 2006.On Wednesday, the Department of Justice announced in a statement that the ads will fill the US media starting from November 30 and into the next year, On November 30, 50 of the major US newspapers, including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and The Washington Post will begin to publish full-page ads that should "clarify" to the public what the true effects of tobacco are, according to the department.In addition, from the beginning of next week, TV channels across the country will start running those ads for a year.The ads will include some of these phrases: "smoking kills, on average, 1,200 Americans every day", "smoking is highly addictive, nicotine is the addictive drug in tobacco" and "cigarette companies intentionally designed cigarettes with enough nicotine to create and sustain addiction".The legal case dates back to 1999, when former President Bill Clinton's administration (1993-2001) accused tobacco companies of deceiving the public about the risks of smoking and promoting cigarettes with cartoon ads to attract teenagers.The accusations were based on a special law called the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organisations Act (RICO), initially promulgated to combat organised crime groups like the mafia.As part of that process, in 2006, the District of Columbia Court ordered the companies Altria, its affiliate Philip Morris USA and R.J. Reynolds Tobacco to place advertisements in the US media to "correct" the misperception the public had for years about tobacco.The 2006 court order is set to be enforced from November 30, more than 10 years late, due to a large amount of counter-complaints filed by US tobacco companies. 

  • Slow pace in old age may indicate heart diseases

    21.11.2017 | Are you facing difficulty in taking rapid steps? Beware, it may indicate the risk of chronic heart illness.Older adults with walking problems are at a higher risk of developing heart diseases, a new study says.The study, published in the journal of the American Geriatrics Society, stated that the link between heart disease risk factors and walking difficulties was greater in people belonging to the older age group.Aging enhances the problems of balance, muscle strength and flexibility, physical strength that could also lead to numerous limitations and disabilities.Heart disease risk factors such as smoking, living with diabetes, obesity or being physically inactive were linked to having a slower walking speed, the researchers noted.The study, led by Emerald G. Heiland, researcher at the Karolinska University in Sweden, studied over participants aged 60 and above. The participants neither had heart disease at the start of the study nor any problems with walking speed, balance or chair standing exercises.Researchers considered participants’ physical activity levels, alcohol consumption, body mass index and the cognitive abilities that helps to think and make decisions.In addition, the blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) were also tested. High CRP levels point to a higher risk for heart diseases, which remains a serious concern for older people.The results showed that the more risk factors people had for heart disease, the faster their decline in walking speed.The researchers concluded that reducing heart disease risk factors with appropriate treatments might help “younger” older adults maintain their physical function. 

  • Schizophrenia drug could treat ALS

    17.11.2017 | Researchers have found that a drug used to treat schizophrenia has the potential to slow the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig's disease, a fatal neurodegenerative condition for which there is currently no effective cure. This neurodegenerative disease normally leads to a progressive paralysis of the skeletal muscles and, on average, three years after the onset of symptoms, to death. After six years of research on several animal models and a few patients, the researchers discovered that the drug, pimozide, stabilises the disease in the short term. The study, published in the journal JCI Insight, found the medication to be safe. "This medication alleviates the symptoms of ALS in animal models," said Alex Parker, a researcher at University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre in Canada. "Riluzole and edaravone, the drugs currently used, have modest effects. Other studies must be conducted to confirm our results, but we believe that we've found a medication that may prove to be more effective in improving patients' quality of life," Parker added. Although pimozide has been well-known for 50 years, recent studies uncovered genetic links between schizophrenia and ALS. The researchers said that their next step is to conduct a phase-2 clinical trial on 100 volunteers in nine hospital centres across Canada. "At this stage, people with ALS should not use this medication," Lawrence Korngut, Associate Professor at the Cumming School of Medicine at the University of Calgary in Canada, said. "We must first confirm that it is really useful and safe in the longer term. It is also important to be aware that pimozide is associated with significant side effects. Therefore, it should only be prescribed in the context of a research study," Korngut added. 

All News

    
  • Excess body fat increases dementia risk: Study
    Excess body fat increases dementia risk: Study

    01.12.2017 |Obese people are at an increased risk of developing dementia than those with a normal weight, says a large study involving data from 1.3 million adults. The researchers found that each five-unit increase in body mass index (BMI) was associated with a 16-33 per cent higher risk of this condition.Five BMI units is 14.5kg for a person who is five feet and seven inch (170cm) tall. This study, published in the Alzheimer’s & Dementia journal, suggests that maintaining a healthy weight could prevent, or at least delay, dementia.The researchers also found that people near dementia onset, who then go on to develop dementia, tend to have lower body weight than their dementia-free counterparts.“The BMI-dementia association observed in longitudinal population studies, such as ours, is actually attributable to two processes,” said lead author of the study, Professor Mika Kivimaki of University College London. One is an adverse effect of excess body fat on dementia risk and the other is weight loss due to pre-clinical dementia.“For this reason, people who develop dementia may have a higher-than-average body mass index some 20 years before dementia onset, but close to overt dementia have a lower BMI than those who remain healthy,” Kivimaki said.The study confirms both the adverse effect of obesity as well as weight loss caused by metabolic changes during the pre-dementia stage. In this study, researchers from across Europe pooled individual-level data from 39 longitudinal population studies from the US and Europe.A total of 1,349,857 dementia-free adults participated in these studies and their weight and height were assessed. Dementia was ascertained using linkage to electronic health records obtained from hospitalisation, prescribed medication and death registries.A total of 6,894 participants developed dementia during up to 38 years of follow-up. Two decades before symptomatic dementia, higher BMI predicted dementia occurrence, the study said. The researchers also found that mean level of BMI during pre-clinical stage close to dementia onset was lower compared to that in participants who remained healthy.

  • US tobacco firms to publish anti-smoking ads in dailies
    US tobacco firms to publish anti-smoking ads in dailies

    23.11.2017 |Major American cigarette manufacturers will begin publishing anti-smoking ads in 50 dailies to correct the misleading statements they made over the years about the effects of smoking, a move that complies with a court order filed in 2006.On Wednesday, the Department of Justice announced in a statement that the ads will fill the US media starting from November 30 and into the next year, On November 30, 50 of the major US newspapers, including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and The Washington Post will begin to publish full-page ads that should "clarify" to the public what the true effects of tobacco are, according to the department.In addition, from the beginning of next week, TV channels across the country will start running those ads for a year.The ads will include some of these phrases: "smoking kills, on average, 1,200 Americans every day", "smoking is highly addictive, nicotine is the addictive drug in tobacco" and "cigarette companies intentionally designed cigarettes with enough nicotine to create and sustain addiction".The legal case dates back to 1999, when former President Bill Clinton's administration (1993-2001) accused tobacco companies of deceiving the public about the risks of smoking and promoting cigarettes with cartoon ads to attract teenagers.The accusations were based on a special law called the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organisations Act (RICO), initially promulgated to combat organised crime groups like the mafia.As part of that process, in 2006, the District of Columbia Court ordered the companies Altria, its affiliate Philip Morris USA and R.J. Reynolds Tobacco to place advertisements in the US media to "correct" the misperception the public had for years about tobacco.The 2006 court order is set to be enforced from November 30, more than 10 years late, due to a large amount of counter-complaints filed by US tobacco companies. 

  • Slow pace in old age may indicate heart diseases
    Slow pace in old age may indicate heart diseases

    21.11.2017 |Are you facing difficulty in taking rapid steps? Beware, it may indicate the risk of chronic heart illness.Older adults with walking problems are at a higher risk of developing heart diseases, a new study says.The study, published in the journal of the American Geriatrics Society, stated that the link between heart disease risk factors and walking difficulties was greater in people belonging to the older age group.Aging enhances the problems of balance, muscle strength and flexibility, physical strength that could also lead to numerous limitations and disabilities.Heart disease risk factors such as smoking, living with diabetes, obesity or being physically inactive were linked to having a slower walking speed, the researchers noted.The study, led by Emerald G. Heiland, researcher at the Karolinska University in Sweden, studied over participants aged 60 and above. The participants neither had heart disease at the start of the study nor any problems with walking speed, balance or chair standing exercises.Researchers considered participants’ physical activity levels, alcohol consumption, body mass index and the cognitive abilities that helps to think and make decisions.In addition, the blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) were also tested. High CRP levels point to a higher risk for heart diseases, which remains a serious concern for older people.The results showed that the more risk factors people had for heart disease, the faster their decline in walking speed.The researchers concluded that reducing heart disease risk factors with appropriate treatments might help “younger” older adults maintain their physical function. 

  • Schizophrenia drug could treat ALS
    Schizophrenia drug could treat ALS

    17.11.2017 |Researchers have found that a drug used to treat schizophrenia has the potential to slow the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig's disease, a fatal neurodegenerative condition for which there is currently no effective cure. This neurodegenerative disease normally leads to a progressive paralysis of the skeletal muscles and, on average, three years after the onset of symptoms, to death. After six years of research on several animal models and a few patients, the researchers discovered that the drug, pimozide, stabilises the disease in the short term. The study, published in the journal JCI Insight, found the medication to be safe. "This medication alleviates the symptoms of ALS in animal models," said Alex Parker, a researcher at University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre in Canada. "Riluzole and edaravone, the drugs currently used, have modest effects. Other studies must be conducted to confirm our results, but we believe that we've found a medication that may prove to be more effective in improving patients' quality of life," Parker added. Although pimozide has been well-known for 50 years, recent studies uncovered genetic links between schizophrenia and ALS. The researchers said that their next step is to conduct a phase-2 clinical trial on 100 volunteers in nine hospital centres across Canada. "At this stage, people with ALS should not use this medication," Lawrence Korngut, Associate Professor at the Cumming School of Medicine at the University of Calgary in Canada, said. "We must first confirm that it is really useful and safe in the longer term. It is also important to be aware that pimozide is associated with significant side effects. Therefore, it should only be prescribed in the context of a research study," Korngut added. 

  • Humans began eating grapes 22,000 years ago: Study
    Humans began eating grapes 22,000 years ago: Study

    04.11.2017 |Humans started consuming grapes nearly 22,000 years ago when the ice sheets covering much of North America and Europe began retreating, finds a genomic study.The study found evidence that people may have been eating the popular fruit as many as 15,000 years before they domesticated the fruit as an agricultural crop."Like most plants, grapes are typically considered to have been cultivated around 7,000 to 10,000 years ago, but our work suggests that human involvement with grapes may precede these dates," said Brandon Gaut, evolutionary biologist and Professor at the University of California - Irvine."The data indicate that humans gathered grapes in the wild for centuries before cultivating them. If we are right, it adds to a small but growing set of examples that humans had big effects on ecosystems prior to the onset of organised agriculture," he said. For the study, appearing in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences, the team compared the sequenced genomes of wild and domesticated Eurasian grapes.The scientists found that populations of the fruit steadily decreased until the period of domestication, when grapes began to be grown and harvested for wine. The long decline could reflect unknown natural processes, or it may mean that humans began managing natural populations long before they were actually domesticated, the researchers said.The altering of several important genes -- involved in sex determination and others related primarily to the production of sugar -- during domestication was a key turning point for the fruit. These changes helped define grapes and probably contributed to the spreading of the crop throughout the ancient world, Gaut noted.In addition, the modern grape genomes contained more potentially harmful mutations than did the fruit's wild ancestors. These accumulate due to clonal propagation, which is reproduction by multiplication of genetically identical copies of individual plants, the researchers said. 

  • EXPERIMENTAL VACCINE DESIGN SHOWS HOPE FOR HIV PATIENTS
    EXPERIMENTAL VACCINE DESIGN SHOWS HOPE FOR HIV PATIENTS

    29.10.2017 |Researchers have designed a novel experimental vaccine that spurs animals to produce antibodies against sugars that form a protective shield around human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the body.The molecule could one day become part of a successful HIV vaccine, the researchers said. "An obstacle to creating an effective HIV vaccine is the difficulty of getting the immune system to generate antibodies against the sugar shield of multiple HIV strains," said Lai-Xi Wang, professor at the University of Maryland.  "Our method addresses this problem by designing a vaccine component that mimics a protein-sugar part of this shield," Wang added, in the paper published in the journal Cell Chemical Biology. The team designed a vaccine candidate using an HIV protein fragment linked to a sugar group.  The protein fragment comes from gp120 -- a protein that covers HIV like a protective envelope, bolstering HIV's defenses.  When injected into rabbits, the vaccine candidate stimulated antibody responses against the sugar shield in four different HIV strains.  The rare HIV-infected individuals who can keep the virus at bay without medication typically have antibodies that attack gp120, the researchers noted. "This result was significant because producing antibodies that directly target the defensive sugar shield is an important step in developing immunity against the target and therefore the first step in developing a truly effective vaccine. Although, "We have not hit a home run yet, but the ability of the vaccine candidate to raise substantial antibodies against the sugar shield in only two months is encouraging," Wang added.

  •  Inadequate physical activity may boost genetic risk of obesity
    Inadequate physical activity may boost genetic risk of obesity

    23.10.2017 |Researchers have found that low levels of physical activity and inefficient sleep patterns may intensify the effects of genetic risk factors for obesity."We wanted to find out if obesity-related genes and activity level have an interactive effect on obesity risk - if there is a 'double whammy' effect of being both at genetic risk and physically inactive beyond the additive effect of these factors," said the study's lead author Andrew Wood, a researcher at the University of Exeter Medical School.The new study made use of wrist accelerometer data and a large genetic dataset from about 85,000 UK Biobank participants aged 40 to 70.The researchers computed a genetic risk score for each participant based on 76 common variants known to be associated with elevated risk of obesity and analyzed this score in the context of accelerometer data and participants' BMIs.They found the strongest evidence to date of a modest gene-activity interaction. For example, for a person of average height with 10 genetic variants associated with obesity, the genetic risk accounted for a 3.6 kg increase in weight among those who were less physically active but just 2.8 kg among those who were more active. The results were similar in analyses of sleep patterns. Among the participants with some genetic risk of obesity, those who woke up frequently or slept more restlessly had higher BMIs than those who slept more efficiently.The results of the study was presented at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2017 annual meeting in Orlando."We hope these findings will inform clinicians who help people lose or maintain their weight and contribute to the understanding that obesity is complex and its prevention may look different for different people," said Timothy Frayling, Professor at the University of Exeter Medical School.

  • Want to boost brain power? This exercise can help
    Want to boost brain power? This exercise can help

    19.10.2017 |  Researchers have found that practicing what is known as a "dual n-back" exercise can lead to improvement in working memory, which is what people rely on to temporarily hold details in their mind like phone numbers and directions. The "dual n-back" is a memory sequence test in which people must remember a constantly updating sequence of visual and auditory stimuli. "People say cognitive training either works or doesn't work. We showed that it matters what kind of training you're doing," said lead author Kara Blacker who was with Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore at the time of the research. "This one task seems to show the most consistent results and the most impact on performance and should be the one we focus on if we're interested in improving cognition through training," said Blacker, now a researcher at the Henry M. Jackson Foundation for Advancement of Military Medicine Inc in Maryland. The researchers decided to compare directly the leading types of exercises and measure people's brain activity before and after training. First, the team assembled three groups of participants, all young adults. Everyone took an initial battery of cognitive tests to determine baseline working memory, attention and intelligence.  

  • Neuro disease-related deaths up 36% in 25 years: Study
    Neuro disease-related deaths up 36% in 25 years: Study

    14.10.2017 |The number of deaths due to neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's disease, stroke and epilepsy has increased globally by over 36 per cent in the past 25 years, according to a study published in The Lancet journal.Neurological disorders (NDs) are the leading cause of death and disability in the world today, said Vasily Vlassov, Professor at National Research University Higher School of Economics in Russia.In 2015, they ranked as the leading cause group of DALYs (disability-adjusted life years), comprising 10.2 per cent of global DALYs, and the second-leading cause group of deaths, comprising 16.8 per cent of global deaths.The most prevalent neurological disorders were tension-type headaches (about 1,500 million cases), migraine (about 1,000 million), medication overuse headaches (about 60 million), and Alzheimer's disease and other dementias (about 46 million cases).Between 1990 and 2015, the number of deaths from neurological disorders increased by 36.7 per cent, and the number of DALYs by 7.4 per cent.One of the main reasons for the increase in neurological disorders is longer life expectancy.People live longer and, accordingly, suffer dementias more often than several decades ago, Vlassov said.Another reason is a growing population. The more people, the more diseases are registered.Considering the number of cases per 100,000 people, there is a positive tendency - age-standardised rates of deaths and DALYs caused by NDs decreased by 26 and 29.7 per cent respectively between 1990 and 2015, researchers said.Stroke and communicable neurological disorders were responsible for most of these decreases, in addition to improved life standards, health care and medicine research development."But communicable neurological disorders in low-income countries are replaced by chronic NDs in the high-income ones. Death rates are falling, while the burden of non-mortal sufferings in a long life with a disease grows," said Vlassov.The rates of cases per 100,000 people increased in such diseases as Parkinson's (by 15.7 per cent), Alzheimer's (2.4 per cent), motor neuron disease (3.1 per cent), and brain and nervous system cancers (8.9 per cent).Neurological diseases are widespread both in high-income and low-income countries.High-income countries, as well as Latin American countries have the lowest rates of DALYs (less than 3,000 per 100,000 people) and deaths (less than 100 per 100,000) due to ND, researchers said.The highest rates (over 7,000 and over 280 per 100,000 people respectively) were estimated for Afghanistan and several African countries.

  • Eating too much sweets bad for heart
    Eating too much sweets bad for heart

    05.10.2017 |Drinking too many soft drinks and eating a lot of sweets may put even otherwise healthy people at increased risk of heart disease, warns new research. The study, published in the journal Clinical Science, showed that healthy men had increased levels of fat in their blood and fat stored in their livers after they consumed a high sugar diet. "Our findings provide new evidence that consuming high amounts of sugar can alter your fat metabolism in ways that could increase your risk of cardiovascular disease," said Bruce Griffin, Professor of Nutritional Metabolism at the University of Surrey in England.  The researchers looked at two groups of men with either high or low levels of liver fat and fed them a high or low sugar diet. The low sugar diet contained no more than 140 calories a day worth of sugar - an amount close to the recommended intake - while the high sugar diet contained 650 calories worth. After 12 weeks on the high sugar diet, the men with a high level of liver fat - a condition known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) - showed changes in their fat metabolism that are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attacks and strokes. Fat metabolism is the biochemical process by which fats are transported and broken down in the blood, and used by the cells of the body. The results also revealed that when the group of healthy men with a low level of liver fat consumed a high amount of sugar, their liver fat increased and their fat metabolism became similar to that of the men with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. "While most adults don't consume the high levels of sugar we used in this study, some children and teenagers may reach these levels of sugar intake by over-consuming fizzy drinks and sweets," Griffin said. "This raises concern for the future health of the younger population, especially in view of the alarmingly high prevalence of NAFLD in children and teenagers, and exponential rise of fatal liver disease in adults," Griffin added.

  • Know How Pregnant Women Can Quit Smoking
    Know How Pregnant Women Can Quit Smoking

    02.10.2017 |Expecting a baby and cannot quit smoking? Try some text messaging programme as it provides help for pregnant women in fighting the urge to light up a smoke, a new study has found."Our findings show that a text messaging programme helped some groups of pregnant women quit smoking during pregnancy," said lead author Lorien C. Abroms, associate professor at George Washington University.Researchers recruited pregnant women who were already enrolled in an established text messaging programme called "Text4baby". "Text4baby" has been found to have a positive health impact on alcohol consumption during pregnancy, but not in smoking. Researchers wanted to find out if a more intensive mobile phone programme called "Quit4baby" would be more effective."Quit4baby" is targeted to smoking cessation and sends more text messages between one to eight per day aimed at bolstering a pregnant woman's resolve to quit. It allows a woman to text back for more help if she is experiencing a craving or goes back to smoking.To find out, the team recruited nearly 500 pregnant women, who smoked an average of 7 cigarettes per day and wanted more help to quit.After three months, 16 per cent of the women who were enrolled in both "Text4baby" and "Quit4baby" had quit, compared with just 11 per cent of women getting just "Text4baby"."The study's findings published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine suggest a potential new quitting strategy, especially for those later in their pregnancies and older pregnant women," Abroms mentioned.The combo of "Text4baby" and "Quit4baby" helped women aged 26 or older and those in the second and third trimester of pregnancy quit through the delivery date and in some cases beyond.However, the researchers found that the resolve to quit seemed to disappear postpartum as many of these women started smoking again.

  • Heavy drinking in college lowers job prospects later: Study
    Heavy drinking in college lowers job prospects later: Study

    21.09.2017 |“The manner in which students drink appears to be more influential than how much they drink when it comes to predicting the likelihood of getting a job upon graduation,” said study co-author Peter Bamberger of Tel Aviv University in Israel. Each individual episode of student binge-drinking during a month-long period can lower the odds of attaining full-time employment upon graduation, said the study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology.“Binge-drinking” is defined as ingesting four or more alcoholic drinks within two hours by a woman and five or more alcoholic drinks within two hours by a man, according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism in the US.The research found that a non-binge pattern of drinking does not adversely impact job search results unless and until their drinking reaches binge levels. Data for the study was provided by 827 individuals who graduated in 2014, 2015, and 2016 from Cornell University, the University of Washington, the University of Florida, and the University of Michigan in the US.“A student who binge-drinks four times a month has a six per cent lower probability of finding a job than a student who does not engage in similar drinking habits. Those students who drank heavily six times a month increased their unemployment probability to 10 per cent,” Bamberger said.

  • Delhi government to launch campaign against drug use
    Delhi government to launch campaign against drug use

    19.09.2017 | The Delhi government will launch from Wednesday a year-long awareness campaign against drug use, Social Welfare Minister Rajendra Pal Gautam said here on Tuesday. The campaign, to start from the Ambedkar University, will feature seminars, street plays and competitions. Several celebrities will be involved in the campaign. Drug use is a major problem among the children in Delhi, Gautam told the media. He added that the government would take the awareness campaign to colleges, schools and colonies. Read This - Ghazipur landfill: NGT raps NHAI for not lifting waste The minister said he had written to the Lt Governor and senior police officers but the situation had not improved. "If police work properly, it can be stopped easily, but they don't have the will," he added. Asserting that strict investigation is needed to end this menace, Gautam said the government can't do it without the help of police. As part of the campaign, the Delhi government proposes to conduct around 1,200 street plays against drug use and has signed 12 drama clubs of various colleges. 

  • Jet lag drug could ease chemotherapy pain: study
    Jet lag drug could ease chemotherapy pain: study

    16.09.2017 |A drug used to ease the effects of jet lag may also prevent the painful side effects of cancer medications, a study claims.Researchers from University of Edinburgh and University of Aberdeen in the UK found that a drug ? known as melatonin - appeared to prevent pain caused by chemotherapy damage to nerves by blocking the harmful effects on nerve health.They focused on a common condition known as chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain (CINP), which causes tingling and pain sensation to touch and cold temperatures that can be severe enough to cause patients to limit their chemotherapy treatment.CINP affects almost 70 per cent of patients undergoing chemotherapy and can have severe impact on quality of life.Everyday activities, including fastening buttons or walking barefoot, can cause pain that can persist even after the cancer is cured, meaning that some patients are unable to return to work or able to carry out household tasks.Researchers showed that melatonin given prior to chemotherapy limited the damaging effect on nerve cells and the development of pain symptoms.Melatonin did not alleviate pain when CINP had already developed, suggesting that its potential benefits could be as prevention rather than cure, researchers said.They noted that meltdown treatment did not interfere with the beneficial anticancer effects of chemotherapy in human breast and ovarian cancer cells."These findings are very exciting and suggest that melatonin could prevent CINP by protecting nerve cell mitochondria," said Carole Torsney, from University of Edinburgh.The study was published in the Journal of Pineal Research. PTI APA SAR SAR

  •  Binge drinking may alter brain activity in teenagers
    Binge drinking may alter brain activity in teenagers

    15.09.2017 |Is your teenaged son or daughter a binge-drinker? Beware, he or she is more likely to have altered brain activity, which may indicate delayed brain development and be an early sign of brain damage, researchers have warned. The findings showed that the brains of adolescents, which are yet in the developing stages, might be more vulnerable to the effects of alcohol abuse than adults. Researchers from the University of Minho in Portugal, examining electrical activity in various brain regions in college students found that binge drinkers had altered brain activity at rest. They also had significantly higher measurements of specific electrophysiological parameters, known as beta and theta oscillations, in brain regions called the right temporal lobe and bilateral occipital cortex. These changes might indicate a decreased ability to respond to external stimuli and potential difficulties in information processing capacity in young binge drinkers, and may represent some of the first signs of alcohol-induced brain damage, the researchers said, in the paper published in Frontiers in Behavioural Neuroscience. "These features might be down to the particularly harmful effects of alcohol on young brains that are still in development, perhaps by delaying neuromaturational (child development) processes," said lead author Eduardo Lopez-Caneda, from the varsity. "It would be a positive outcome if educational and health institutions used these results to try to reduce alcohol consumption in risky drinkers," Lopez-Caneda said. Binge was describes as drinking five or more drinks for men and four or more for women within a two-hour period. Previous research has linked binge drinking to a variety of negative consequences including neurocognitive deficits, poor academic performance, and risky sexual behaviour.

  • Ornamental plant extract may help combat asthma
    Ornamental plant extract may help combat asthma

    15.09.2017 |Researchers have extracted an active pharmaceutical substance from the leaves of a common ornamental plant — coralberry — which could provide hope for people with asthma.The findings, led by researchers at the University of Bonn in Germany and asthma specialists from the UK, showed that the leaves of the coralberry contain a substance with the cryptic name “FR900359”. The extracts when used in mice almost inhibited the characteristic contraction of the airways.Further, the study found that “FR900359” is very effective at preventing the bronchial muscles from contracting. Asthmatics regularly suffer from these pronounced contractions preventing adequate ventilation of the lungs. The resulting shortness of breath can be life-threatening.The compound in the coralberry leaves relieves these spasms and is supposedly more effective and has a more prolonged action than the most common asthma drug salbutamol, the researchers noted in the paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.Inhibiting the activation of critical signaling molecules in cells — the Gq proteins — with “FR900359”, the researchers found a much greater effect. Gq proteins exert key functions in many processes in the body, including control of the airway tone.“We have so far only tested the substance in asthmatic mice… we were able to prevent the animals from reacting to allergens such as house dust mite with a narrowing of the bronchia,” said lead author Daniela Wenzel, Professor at the varsity.There were hardly any side effects, as the active pharmaceutical ingredient could be applied via inhalation to the respiratory tract and thus only reached the systemic circulation in small quantities.However, further tests, which could take years, are required prior to its application in humans, the researchers said.

  • Consume Dark Chocolates For Healthy Heart
    Consume Dark Chocolates For Healthy Heart

    13.09.2017 |Dark chocolate nowadays is popularly known as one of the best superfoods. If you nibble dark chocolate to satisfy a craving, you're also helping your heart with every bite, say experts.Sonia Narang, Wellness and Nutrition Expert, Oriflame India and Meher Rajput, Nutritionists and Dietician, FITPASS share that how dark chocolates can be healthy too.* Dark chocolate is also preloaded with decent amounts of soluble fibre and potential minerals. It contains Oleic acid, Stearic acid, and Palmitic acid.  * Loaded with organic compounds which are biologically active, dark chocolate can help lower blood pressure and improve the flow of blood in your body. It greatly helps in decreasing the levels of oxidized LDL Cholesterol in men.  * Eating dark chocolate (which has 65 percent polyphenol-rich cocoa) helps to lower blood pressure naturally. * Flavanols found in dark chocolate help in improving your heart health by lowering blood pressure and refining the flow of blood to the heart as well as to the brain. They also help in reducing the risk of cancer. * Dark chocolate also reduces the level of insulin resistance, which is a very common factor behind the birth of diseases like Diabetes, Cardiovascular disease, and other heart ailments.  * Dark chocolate also has a high concentration of an alkaloid called theobromine which has stimulant properties and relaxing effects. It can dilate the blood vessels.

  • What worries cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy the most
    What worries cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy the most

    10.09.2017 |Cancer patients today are worried more about the effects of their illness on their partner or family than the physical side effects of chemotherapy, new research has found. The study presented at European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2017 Congress in Madrid, Spain, showed that socio-psychological factors have become more significant for patients today than physical side-effects such as nausea and vomiting. "What we found is that, on the one hand, side effects like nausea and vomiting are no longer a major problem for patients -- this can be explained by the fact that modern medication against these symptoms is very effective," study author Beyhan Ataseven from Kliniken Essen Mitte Evang, Huyssens-Stiftung in Essen, Germany. "On the other hand, hair loss is still a persistent, unsolved issue that particularly affects patients at the start of their treatment," Ataseven said. "As time passes and patients get used to this, however, their concerns evolve and other side effects become more significant," Ataseven added. The team led by Ataseven focused exclusively on breast and ovarian cancer patients and added a longitudinal analysis by carrying out three separate interviews before, during and at the end of their chemotherapy. At each interview, 141 patients scheduled for or undergoing chemotherapy were presented with two groups of cards respectively featuring physical and non-physical side effects. The patients selected their five most burdensome symptoms in each group and ranked them by importance. Out of these 10 main side effects, they were then asked to select the five most significant ones from both groups and to rank these as well. "Looking at patients' perceptions over the entire course of their chemotherapy, the most difficult side effects they deal with are sleep disorders - which become increasingly important over time - and anxiety about the effects of their illness on their partner or family, which remains a top issue throughout," Ataseven explained. "As doctors, these findings might lead us to consider possible improvements to the accompanying therapies we offer our patients: For instance, sleeping tablets were not until now a part of the routine regimen," Ataseven added. "There is also a clear case for providing stronger psychological support to address patients' social anxieties and family-related concerns," she said. 

  • Your height may up risk of blood clots
    Your height may up risk of blood clots

    06.09.2017 |The taller you are, the more likely you may be at risk of developing blood clots in veins, according to new study of more than two million siblings.The findings showed that the risk of venous thromboembolism -- a type of blood clot that starts in a vein -- was associated with height, with the lowest risk being in shorter participants."Height in the population has increased, and continues increasing, which could be contributing to the fact that the incidence of thrombosis has increased," said lead researcher Bengt Zoller, Associate Professor at Lund University in Sweden.According to Zoller, gravity may influence the association between height and venous thromboembolism risk."It could just be that because taller individuals have longer leg veins there is more surface area where problems can occur," Zoller said."There is also more gravitational pressure in leg veins of taller persons that can increase the risk of blood flow slowing or temporarily stopping."For the study, reported in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics, the team looked at data on more than 1.6 million Swedish men born between 1951 and 1992, and data on more than one million Swedish women who had a first pregnancy between 1982 and 2012.For men shorter than 5 feet 3 inches, the risk for venous thromboembolism dropped 65 per cent when compared to the men 6 feet 2 inches or taller.For women shorter than 5 feet 1 inches who were pregnant for the first time, the risk for venous thromboembolism dropped 69 per cent, compared to women that were 6 feet or taller.Besides, the risk of blood clots, previous studies have linked height also with cancer, heart problems, gestational diabetes and even longevity.

  • Eating meat increases diabetes risk: Study
    Eating meat increases diabetes risk: Study

    06.09.2017 |Eating too much red meat and poultry may increase risk of developing diabetes, a large Asian study suggests.The study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, partially attributes the risk to the higher content of heme iron in these meats.The results suggest that eating fish/shellfish is not associated with risk of diabetes.These findings come from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, which recruited 63,257 adults aged 45-74 years between 1993 and 1998, and then followed them up for an average of about 11 years.In their analysis, Professor Koh Woon Puay from Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore and her team found a positive association between intakes of red meat and poultry, and risk of developing diabetes.Specifically, compared to those in the lowest quartile intake, those in the highest quartile intake of red meat and poultry had a 23 per cent and 15 per cent increase in risk of diabetes, respectively.The increase in risk associated with red meat/poultry was reduced by substituting them with fish/shellfish, the study showed.In trying to understand the underlying mechanism for the role of red meat and poultry in the development of diabetes, the study also investigated the association between dietary heme-iron content from all meats and the risk of diabetes, and found a dose-dependent positive association.After adjusting for heme-iron content in the diet, the red-meat and diabetes association was still present, suggesting that other chemicals present in red meat could be accountable for the increase in risk of diabetes.Conversely, the association between poultry intake and diabetes risk became null, suggesting that this risk was attributable to the heme-iron content in poultry.The study suggests that chicken parts with lower heme-iron contents such as breast meat, compared to thighs, could be healthier. 

Advertisement
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner