UPDATED 05.28PM IST

Share This
  • UK |
  • India |
  • USA |
  • Canada |
  • Mauritius
  •    info@mayatoday.com
Deepak Dogra
  • ad
  • ad
  • ad
  • ad
  • ad
  • ad
  • ad
  • ad
  • ad
  • ad

Slow pace in old age may indicate heart diseases

  • Slow pace in old age may indicate heart diseases

Are you facing difficulty in taking rapid steps? Beware, it may indicate the risk of chronic heart illness.

Older adults with walking problems are at a higher risk of developing heart diseases, a new study says.

The study, published in the journal of the American Geriatrics Society, stated that the link between heart disease risk factors and walking difficulties was greater in people belonging to the older age group.

Aging enhances the problems of balance, muscle strength and flexibility, physical strength that could also lead to numerous limitations and disabilities.

Heart disease risk factors such as smoking, living with diabetes, obesity or being physically inactive were linked to having a slower walking speed, the researchers noted.

The study, led by Emerald G. Heiland, researcher at the Karolinska University in Sweden, studied over participants aged 60 and above. The participants neither had heart disease at the start of the study nor any problems with walking speed, balance or chair standing exercises.

Researchers considered participants’ physical activity levels, alcohol consumption, body mass index and the cognitive abilities that helps to think and make decisions.

In addition, the blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) were also tested. High CRP levels point to a higher risk for heart diseases, which remains a serious concern for older people.

The results showed that the more risk factors people had for heart disease, the faster their decline in walking speed.

The researchers concluded that reducing heart disease risk factors with appropriate treatments might help “younger” older adults maintain their physical function.

 


: November 21, 2017 9:28 pm
Read 148 times

RELATED STORIES

Excess body fat increases dementia risk: Study
Excess body fat increases dementia risk: Study

Obese people are at an increased risk of developing dementia than those with a normal weight, says a

US tobacco firms to publish anti-smoking ads in dailies
US tobacco firms to publish anti-smoking ads in dailies

Major American cigarette manufacturers will begin publishing anti-smoking ads in 50 dailies to corre

Slow pace in old age may indicate heart diseases
Slow pace in old age may indicate heart diseases

Are you facing difficulty in taking rapid steps? Beware, it may indicate the risk of chronic heart i

Schizophrenia drug could treat ALS
Schizophrenia drug could treat ALS

Researchers have found that a drug used to treat schizophrenia has the potential to slow the progres

Humans began eating grapes 22,000 years ago: Study
Humans began eating grapes 22,000 years ago: Study

Humans started consuming grapes nearly 22,000 years ago when the ice sheets covering much of North A

EXPERIMENTAL VACCINE DESIGN SHOWS HOPE FOR HIV PATIENTS
EXPERIMENTAL VACCINE DESIGN SHOWS HOPE FOR HIV PATIENTS

Researchers have designed a novel experimental vaccine that spurs animals to produce antibodies agai

 Inadequate physical activity may boost genetic risk of obesity
Inadequate physical activity may boost genetic risk of obesity

Researchers have found that low levels of physical activity and inefficient sleep patterns may inten

Want to boost brain power? This exercise can help
Want to boost brain power? This exercise can help

  Researchers have found that practicing what is known as a "dual n-back" exerci

Comment*

Captcha* mayatoday
share on facebook
Advertisement
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner
  • banner